Monday, April 30, 2007

Social Media Collective

I have been invited to join Social Media Today.  I first learned about it from fellow blogger Mike Manuel.

Social Media Today “is a collection of the best writing from the Social Media Collective, a diverse group of bloggers, consultants, investors, entrepreneurs, journalists, and analysts who regularly report on social media, marketing and Web 2.0.”  I hope I live up to the billing and a thanks  to Jerry Bowles for the invite. 

In an effort to get to know my fellow borthers and sisters, I checked out their recent postings over the weekend. Their entries run the gamut of what social media has to offer.  Among the posts about conferences that they are attending, studies they are reading, and time off they are taking, here are several that caught my eye:

Any PR person’s dreaded topic — measuring online performace, a posting by John Bell.  On the topic of research and numbers, Charlene Li writes about the new Forrester study on Social Technographics looking at how consumers approach social technologies – not just the adoption of individual technologies.

Planning or Timing – You Decide – Rohit Bhargava opines on the notion that when it comes to marketing, timing is everything – even in online marketing. The problem is, it misses the one element that is perhaps the most important … timing.”  In another posting, Amanda Chapel writes on the topic of mobile marketing of the 18 wheeler kind and emphasizes first and foremost that planning is everything – Failing to plan is planning to fail.”

Michael O’Connor Clarke and Dennis Howlett enlist the same Dilbert cartoon to address concerns over corporate ghost writing. 

On the topic of PowerPointNathan Gilliatt looks at user-generated content vs PowerPoint and asks,If your presentation visuals taken in the aggregate (e.g., your “PowerPoint deck”) can be perfectly and completely understood without your narration, then it begs the question: why are you there?  Is it time to ditch power point (sic)?   Meanwhile David Tebbutt looks at PowerPoint’s two conflicting purposes.– “One for posterity and the other for the gig itself.” Apparently the brain cannot process textual and verbal inputs concurrently. Believe me anything is preferable to looking at 8 pt typeface even on a large screen.

There is a poignant posting on the tragic shootings at Virginia Tech by Gary Goldhammer. As one parent of slain student urged:  Hug your loved ones — now!

Great minds dept. — A posting by Brian Magierski on Nike looking for a new ad agency that is more digital savvy – a topic I have discussed as well.   

Representing the Social Media ClubChris Heuer one of the founders of social Media Club.  I am involved with its Atlanta chapter.  Brian Solis, another Social Media Club co-founder, opines on PR Version inflation.  Are we on PR, PR 1.0, 2.0 or as PR Week suggested 3.0  I suppose the number you choose depends on how far you think the industry has embraced social media in theory and practice.

Love Links — Peter Himler writes about linking and link love and concludes, “But remember, you’ve got to give to receive.” (I hear you Peter!)

Mathew Ingram writes about the illusion of user-generated content.  How much power do consumers and fans actually have?

Mark Kuznicki opines on formulating a new definition for television in a new media age. What is television when we can download and watch episodes of “Lost” on our laptops? I have asked the same question about newspapers.  Is a newspaper still a newspaper when it comes with audio and video on a website?  Maybe the newspaper construct goes away after I stop getting ink on my hands from reading the New York Times in Starbucks. 

Bee Ware – Mitch Ratcliffe discusses research that shows that wireless phone radiation is interfering with bees’ navigational abilities.  The implications for bees and us are buzz worthy.

An interesting slice of trivia by Giovanni Rodriguez – Norwegians consume more pizza per capita than any other country in the world. Not sure what I can do with this, but worth chewing on preferably at pizzeria near you.

Posted a while back, some interesting predictions on word of mouth marketing by Todd Tweedy.

Telling the Truth Melvin Yuan observes: “When PR professionals successfully mask the truth to get a positive story where a negative one could have resulted, we get applauded for solving the problem.”  Masking the truth is never a good thing.  But making sure your side is heard and masking the truth are the not necessarily the same thing. 

Happy reading.

Let me get back to you.

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Posted by Dan Greenfield in 16:50:50 | Permalink | Comments (2)